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Image from page 222 of “The Pacific tourist : Williams’ illustrated trans-continental guide of travel, from the Atlantic to the Pacific Ocean : containing full descriptions of railroad routes across the continent, all pleasure resorts and places of most n
University of Colorado
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Identifier: pacifictouristwi00will
Title: The Pacific tourist : Williams’ illustrated trans-continental guide of travel, from the Atlantic to the Pacific Ocean : containing full descriptions of railroad routes across the continent, all pleasure resorts and places of most noted scenery in the far West, also of all cities, towns, villages, U.S. Forts, springs, lakes, mountains, routes of summer travel, best localities for hunting, fishing, sporting, and enjoyment, with all needful information for the pleasure traveler, miner, settler, or business man : a complete traveler’s guide of the Union and Central Pacific Railroads and all points of business or pleasure travel to California, Colorado, Nebraska, Wyoming, Utah, Nevada, Montana, the mines and mining of the territories, the lands of the Pacific Coast, the wonders of the Rocky Mountains, the scenery of the Sierra Nevadas, the Colorado mountains, the big trees, the geysers, the Yosemite, and the Yellowstone
Year: 1877 (1870s)
Authors: Williams, Henry T
Subjects: Union Pacific Railroad Company Central Pacific Railroad Company
Publisher: New York : H.T. Williams
Contributing Library: Harold B. Lee Library
Digitizing Sponsor: Brigham Young University

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was several hours before noon. The mill is situated in the lower belt of tim-ber, and there are between 400 and 500 men atwork. This number includes those engaged incutting trees, hauling logs, and sawing the lum-ber. How the heavy machinery of the mills,and the engines which work them were broughtfrom the city up the mountains and placed inposition, is another mystery which I have nottried to investigate. The amount of lumber turned out by theowner of these mills, the upper and the lower, theformer being two and one-half miles farther upthe mountain, is marvellous. In five minutes time, a log from two to fourfeet in diameter is reduced to lumber, planks,scantling, boards, and square timber, perhaps allfrom the same log, for it is cut in the most ad-vantageous manner. Sometimes one log willgive three or four different kinds of lumber.The lower mill is kept running night and day, andhas a capacity of 50,000 feet per day of smallstuff, and of 70,000 feet when working on largetimber. 221

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SUMMITS OF THE SIERRAS. BY THOMAS MOHAN.

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Image from page 131 of “Anthropology; an introduction to the study of man and civilization” (1896)
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Identifier: anthropologyint00tylo
Title: Anthropology; an introduction to the study of man and civilization
Year: 1896 (1890s)
Authors: Tylor, Edward Burnett, Sir, 1832-1917
Subjects: Anthropology Civilization
Publisher: New York, D. Appleton
Contributing Library: Robarts – University of Toronto
Digitizing Sponsor: University of Toronto

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ColoradoIndians, while in Fig. 43 the Cauixana Indians may standas examples of the rude and sluggish forest-men of Brazil.While tribes of America and Asia may thus be of oneoriginal stock, we must look cautiously at theories as tothe ocean and island routes by which Asiatics may havemigrated to people the New World. It is probable thatman had appeared there, as in the Old World, in anearlier geological period than the present, so that the firstkinship between the Mongols and the North AmericanIndians may go back to a time when there was no oceanbetween them. What looks like later communication be-tween the two continents, is that the stunted Eskimo withtheir narrow roof-topped skulls may be a branch of theJapanese stock, while there are signs of the comparativelycivilized Mexicans and Peruvians having in some wayreceived arts and ideas from Asiatic nations. We come last to the white men, whose nations have allthrough history been growing more and more dominant io6 ANTHROPOLOGY. [chap.

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Fig. 41.—Colorado Indian (North America). intellectually, morally, and politically on the earth. Thoughcommonly spoken of as one variety of mankind, it is plainthat they are not a single uniform race, but a varied and III.] RACES OF MANKIND. 107

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