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Image from page 220 of “Nature neighbors, embracing birds, plants, animals, minerals, in natural colors by color photography, containing articles by Gerald Alan Abbott, Dr. Albert Schneider, William Kerr Higley…and other eminent naturalists. Ed. by Nath
University of Colorado
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: natureneighborse41914bant
Title: www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/book…
Year: 1914 (1910s)
Authors: Banta, Nathaniel Moore, 1867- Schneider, Albert, 1863- Higley, William Kerr, 1860-1908 Abbott, Gerard Alan
Subjects: Natural history
Publisher: Chicago, American Audobon association
Contributing Library: University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign
Digitizing Sponsor: University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign

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says, The notes of the car-dinals are clear and tender—far sweeter than the mellowestnotes of fife or clarionet. Red-birds are easily capturedand make admirable cage birds. Until our song-bird lawwent into effect cardinals were handled extensively by vari-ous song-bird dealers. The nests are built in shrubs, vines, and young treesabout residences in small towns and villages. The nestsare of twigs, bark, grass, and leaves, lined with finer sub-stances of the same. Three or four bluish-white eggs,heavily spotted with dark brown and lavender, are laid.The nests are usually not to exceed ten feet above theground. The birds enjoy a thicket or dense growth ofshrubbery similar to that inhabited by our catbird orbrown thrasher. They raise two broods in a season, themale caring for the first brood while the female attends tonesting duties. They sometimes select for nesting sitesshrubbery about porticoes, seemingly to avoid the blue jays.They are very restless when disturbed in their nesting.

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FINCHES, SPARROWS, ETC. 847 ROSE-BREASTED GROSBEAK One of the handsomest of our common North Amer-ican songsters, the male Rose-breasted Grosbeak may bereadily identified by the bright rose-colored blotch on thebreast. The same tone may be found on the under side ofthe wing in both sexes, but this is not clearly seen, andcannot be considered a sure field mark. The birds occurfrom the Atlantic west to the Great Plains and north intosouthern Canada. Shrubbery along streams or low sap-lings are favorite resorts for the grosbeak during the springand summer months. The beautiful rose-breasted grosbeak breeds in thenorthern half of the United States east of the MissouriRiver, but spends its winters beyond our boundaries. Thebeauty of the adult male is proverbial; the plumage is pureblack and white, with a broad patch of brilliant rose colorupon the breast and under each wing. These birds are of vast importance to the agriculturist,as they destroy Colorado potato bugs, which so few of ourbir

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USA – CO – University of Colorado Health Science Center Police
University of Colorado
Image by conner395
Part of my collection of USA Law enforcement patches.

Image from page 799 of “The Black Hills, or, The last hunting ground of the Dakotahs : a complete history of the Black Hills of Dakota, from their first invasion in 1874 to the present time, comprising a comprehensive account of how they lost them : of nu
University of Colorado
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: blackhillsorlast00tallrich
Title: The Black Hills, or, The last hunting ground of the Dakotahs : a complete history of the Black Hills of Dakota, from their first invasion in 1874 to the present time, comprising a comprehensive account of how they lost them : of numerous adventures of the early settlers : their heroic struggles for supremacy against the hostile Dakotah Tribes, and their final victory : the opening of the country to white settlement, and it subsequent development
Year: 1899 (1890s)
Authors: Tallent, Annie D
Subjects: Dakota Indians Black Hills (S.D. and Wyo.) — History
Publisher: St. Louis, : Nixon-Jones Print. Co.
Contributing Library: University of California Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: MSN

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ly publication, andwhat is most interesting to note, the paper is conducted byHarry Godard, who, as many of the old-timers will doubt-less remember, carried the first mall over the trail fromFort Laramie to Custer during the winter of 1875-i).Several handsome business blocks grace the main street ofthe town, whose trade along the different lines comparesfavorably with any other town of its size in the BlackHills. A number of important industrial and commercial 4.3 674 THE BLACK HILLS ; OK, enterprises are under process of construction, amono; whichare a grindstone manufactory, a woolen mill, and a smelter,for whose surplus products the Burlington Eailway willbring a ready market to their doors. These enterprisesindicate a public spirit, on the part of its business men,which is bound ultimately to bring its reward. The other towns of Fall River County are Oelrich,once quite an important cattle shipping station on the lineof the Elkhorn railroad, Smithwick, Hat Creek, Ardmore,and Evans.

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LAST HUNTING GUOUNU OF THE DAKOTAHS. 675 CHAPTEK XLIV. BUTTE COUNTY. Prior to 1880, nearly all of the territory now embracedwithin the limits of Butte County, and the wide scope of richgrazing lands lying contiguous thereto on the north, waspracticall}^ unknown to white men. Until that time, withthe exception of a few herds along the valleys of lowerBelle Fourche and Redwater, and the adjacent uplands, theregion was the undisputed home of the buffalo, which, pity tis, owing to their wanton killing by red and whitehunters alike, had become nearly extinct before the adventof white settlers. About this time, the attention of cattleowners in Colorado, Kansas, and other distant parts, wasattracted to this paradise of the stock grower, and theybegan to drive their herds from the overcrowded rangesof the South and Southwest to the untrammeled freedom ofthe Northern plains, which henceforth became the stamping-ground of the dashing, festive cowboy. Soon after, the permanent settlement of the

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