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Image from page 21 of “Through Colorado and Yellowstone Park to the Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition, Seattle, 1909” (1909)
University of Colorado
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Identifier: throughcoloradoy295chic
Title: Through Colorado and Yellowstone Park to the Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition, Seattle, 1909
Year: 1909 (1900s)
Authors: Chicago & Eastern Illinois Railroad Company
Subjects: Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition (1909 : Seattle, Wash.) Railroad travel Railroad travel Railroad travel
Publisher: [Chicago] : Rock Island-Frisco Lines, Chicago & Eastern Illinois R.R.
Contributing Library: Harold B. Lee Library
Digitizing Sponsor: Brigham Young University

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The Glaciers Are But Three Days from Other Events This Summer National Association Woman Suffrage Seattle, July 1-7, 1909 An event of significant importance to womenpromises to be of more than passing interest. which N. E. A. Annual MeetingDenver, July 3-9, 1909 Denver is always an interesting metropolis, but the moreso during convention time. Numerous one-day side tripscan be enjoyed at small expense. N. E. A. folder on request. Epworth League International ConventionSeattle, July 7-12, 1909 Seattle will attract thousands this year. Why not planto visit the exposition at the time of the Epworth LeagueInternational Convention? B. P. O. E., Grand Lodge ReunionLos Angeles, July 11-17, 1909 On your visit to the coast this summer plan to attendthe Elks Reunion. You will then see Los Angeles ather best. An elaborate program has been prepared andvisitors are assured of a most enjoyable time. Folderdesci-iptive of the event on request. G. A. R. National Encampment Salt Lake City, August 9-14

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Image from page 124 of “New Mexico, the land of the delight makers : the history of its ancient cliff dwellings and pueblos, conquest by the Spaniards, Franciscan missions; personal accounts of the ceremonies, games, social life and industries of its Indi
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Identifier: newmexicolandofd00jamerich
Title: New Mexico, the land of the delight makers : the history of its ancient cliff dwellings and pueblos, conquest by the Spaniards, Franciscan missions; personal accounts of the ceremonies, games, social life and industries of its Indians; a description of its climate, geology, flora and birds, its rivers and forests; a review of its rapid development, land-reclamation projects and educational system; with full and accurate account of its progressive counties, cities and towns
Year: 1920 (1920s)
Authors: James, George Wharton, 1858-1923
Subjects: New Mexico — Description and travel
Publisher: Boston : The Page company
Contributing Library: University of California Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: MSN

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Colorado River, towhich their canyon is tributary. It was an interesting meal in which the most scrupu-lous care was taken to please the guest, to see that he wasserved first and abundantly, and that everything was tohis pleasure. Let us watch Tsnaheys wife make the wafer bread,which is so strange and interesting at first sight. It ismade of corn meal finely ground. Of this a soft batteris made. Now it is ready to bake. A large flat stone israised so that a fire can be made underneath it. Whenthe stone is hot enough, a piece of mutton tallow is rap-idly rubbed over its surface, and then the hewe -makerdips her fingers in the batter and rapidly rubs them overthe hot surface. Almost the moment she touches the slabthe batter cooks into a thin, wafer-like sheet, so that, attwo or three dips and passages over the surface, thereappears a large sheet of the bread. Before it is per-fectly dry it is folded over and over again until it isabout the size of a shredded-wheat biscuit and then it is

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WE-WHA, THE REMARKABLE ZUNI CHARACTER WHO VISITEDPRESIDENT CLEVELAND. My Adventures at Zuni 63 ready to be eaten. Naturally it is dainty, delicate, andmakes a very palatable bread. The sleeping-arrangements of the Zunis are quite sim-ple. In one corner of every well-appointed house hangsa long pole, suspended by thongs of rawhide at each end.This is poetically termed the pole of the soft stuff.The term soft stuff includes sheep and goat skins, bear,coyote, mountain-lion, badger, and other wild-beast skins,together with the robes the Zunis themselves weave orpurchase from the Navahos. While a few blankets arewoven by the Zunis they have almost abandoned the art,as they are better potters than weavers. It is appropriate here that I give a brief account ofWe-wha, a noted Zuni woman, whose death caused atrial for witchcraft as related in another chapter. Shewas a remarkable woman, a fine blanket and sash maker,an excellent cook, an adept in all the work of her sex,and yet strange to say,

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University of Colorado at Boulder
University of Colorado
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